Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘rocks’


Not the beach view anyone wants

These are just my own personal ramblings about an incident that has caused a sickening loss of life. My heart goes out to the families and friends of those who perished, as well as the survivors who will doubtless relive those terrifying events in their minds eye for many years to come.

From every marine accident there is an investigation and from every investigation there are conclusions. Such investigations are not tasked with prosecuting the guilty, they are simply to find the facts of what happened and why it happened, so that where required, systems or procedures or equipment can be changed or modified to try to ensure the same thing will not happen again.

The relevant police authorities will make their own enquiries to deal with the facts of suspected liability and guilt. Thereafter the relevant legal jurisdiction will act accordingly on the matter.

But more than that, after an incident like this with such a tragic loss of life, surely in many maritime regions and territories, the relevant persons are asking: Could this happen here ?

That is a question to which I believe there is no “Yes or No” answer, but there are a lot of things to consider.

There is a simple and chilling fact; any accident at sea or elsewhere is analogous to a chemical reaction, if you allow the dangerous mix of ingredients into the same place at the same time then there may well be a violent reaction.

If you can keep them separate, then hopefully nothing happens. In many accidents at sea the ‘ingredients’ are speed, complacency, poor lookout, visibility and navigation, systems failure, and the unexpected.

As to the question; Could it happen in Singapore ? well it could, but in my opinion, it’s very unlikley, and here’s why.

Firstly the relevant Goverment Agency, the Maritime & Port Authority, MPA, has been very active for many years in “managing” the operation of ferry traffic in Singapore. One of the major features of this is that all ferries are required to follow demarcated routes into and out of, and through Singapore waters, and the routes are well defined and well known by near all users. In addition these ferries are required to adhere to set day & night speed limits for the routes in the direct approaches. Consequently if you are at sea in those corridoors at night, then you expect to meet ferry traffic, and at 12 knots you have a bit of time to spot them, and navigate out of their way.

Just One of the Designated Ferry Routes

It’s worthwhile to note that these routes and speed regulations have been in place for around ten years. Also be assured that they have added time and distance onto each and every journey. I can remember some journeys being around 15 minutes quicker. It was also strange to watch as a ferry gets further away from the destination to follow the route.

Secondly the Police Coastguard has a large presence on the water with a large number or active patrol craft throughout Singapore waters. Whilst they have a multitude of roles, they would seem to keep some form of watch of ferry and private and passenger traffic. This is part deterant, and part Big Brother to make sure that maritime rules and laws are followed.

At a location near you ?

Thirdly, major events such as fireworks, or yacht races or waterborne events, etc. likely dont draw the same volume of on-water spectators in Singapore as perhaps as in cities like Hong Kong, Auckland or wherever. Also Fireworks in Singapore are within sheltered or enclosed waterways, and can be easily, and best viewed from onshore. Just look at any National Day, F1, or New Years event video to see what I mean. Obviously Fireworks are at night, which immediately brings navigational and lookout issues.

Victoria Harbour Fireworks

Fourthly and importantly, the MPA many years ago implemented a scheme of ensuring each and every craft on the water has some form of AIS or HARTS, (Harbour Craft Transponder System) on board. This in effect enables the MPA Port Operations to monitor the location and speed and heading of every craft on the water, if in fact they have the time, the interest and manpower to do that. (Note they’ve just upgraded their system to handle 10,000 vessel tracks at any one time ! Click on photo to follow link to read the release.)

WOW just upgraded, they can handle 10,000 vessel tracks at any given time ! Click to follow link !

In addition there is any number of MPA Pilot boats, and MPA launches out and on the water. There is also the system of Cruising permit application process for Non Singapore registered pleasure craft vessels, which requires approval for their route and schedule for any given cruise.

Perhaps lastly there is the issue of geography and layout. Singapore has a defined and ‘regular’ coastline, and a small number of islands with ferry access, with defined routes of access to and from. Reclamation has played a big role and Islands have been dredged, linked, joined, connected and amalgamated for the use by Indutstry, Military and Leisure/Property Development. In some cases bridges and roads have been built for access, negating the use of ferries.

Other than that, and significantly, the regional ferry traffic has to be very much less than in Hong Kong.

A lot of sea room there. Easier to miss than have a collision

Indicative only. Believe accident site was close to NW tip of Lamma Island.

The investigation is underway in Hong Kong, and the families of the perished will be waiting for those conclusions, to answer the question of “How could this happen”, but the likelyhood is that is that this will all come down to those ingredients mentioned above.

If there is however one immediate lesson to be learned from this whole affair so far, it is the conclusion from the photos below.

It’s a bit unfair to make this comparision as I dont know the standards that each vessel was built to, but the immediate reaction is that one sank, and one made it to the dock, presumed to be under it’s own power.

.

The conclusion ? Travel by Catamaran !

Two Hulls = Two Chances !

.

Image Source : BBC, SCMP, ST, online news outlets, etc.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


Once is Lucky..

Twice is Foolish..

Third time is DEADLY

Video reconstruction of the  AIS Track from the14th August 2011 Sail Past of Giglio Island with two Near Miss of less than one ships length.

http://tinyurl.com/6vvrfpd

 

Also see the route of the January13th sinking at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5tTMJUKjTM

 

YouTube Video of the Costa Concordia Sail Past taken from onshore Giglio Island  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKJszx8NgMY

 

All reconstruction done by www.QPS.nl

Visit their web site for full details.

Read Full Post »


I have uploaded a copy of a Video which it’s believed shows the actual track of the Costa Concordia on her last fateful voyage on Friday the 13th.

It clearly shows whoever was in control of the vessel did not allow for or anticipate the turn that she would make.

Sadly ships over 290m in length and over 114,000 GT don’t handle like sports cruisers or speedboats !

Here’s the link to the Video   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5tTMJUKjTM

Read Full Post »


Exclusive: Costa Concordia in previous close call – FREE CONTENT

Wednesday 18 January 2012, 00:30

by Wally Mandryk and David Osler

Data provided by Lloyd’s List Intelligence

But cruise line insists Friday’s deviation from route was unauthorised

EXCLUSIVE analysis of Lloyd’s List Intelligence tracking data shows that Costa Concordia sailed within 230 m of the coast of Giglio Island on a previous voyage, slightly closer to the shore than where it subsequently hit rocks on Friday.

The cruiseship, which capsized off the Italian coast, had previously changed course to get closer to Giglio on the night of August 14 last year — for La Notte di San Lorenzo, the night of the shooting stars, owners Costa Cruises have said.

Speaking at a news conference on Monday, the company’s chief executive officer, Pier Luigi Foschi, stressed that the decision was taken under the authorisation of the local martime authority and the permission of Costa, after the route was reviewed. He also claimed that the vessel was never closer than 500 metres from the coast at any pont in the voyage.

The route taken on January 13, however, was described by Costa Cruises as a deviation from the pre-planned route to make a manoeuvre that was “unauthorised, unapproved and unknown to Costa”.

Both routes passed within a few hundred metres of each other and the tracking data, obtained through Lloyd’s List Intelligence proprietary land based AIS receivers, proves that the vessel would have been less than 200 m away from the point of collision when it took the previously authorised route. The route also took the vessel far closer than the 500 metres claimed by Costa Crociere.

Meanwhile, the UK Hydrographic Office has issued a statement, declining to comment on whether Costa Concordia was using one of its charts.

However, UKHO has confirmed that Italian charts of the area around Giglio are available on a larger scale than the 1:300,000 charts it issues.

Although this might seem to be a technical matter, the master of the vessel, who is under investigation for suspected manslaughter, has blamed the casualty on the cruiseship hitting an uncharted rock. This could make charts critical to the case for the defence, should the master face a criminal prosecution.

No rock is shown on the UKHO chart at the position in which Costa Concordia sank.

The UKHO said: “This is a regrettable incident where life was lost and a full investigation will be undertaken by the Italian maritime authorities. A report will be published following that investigation.

“The UKHO expects that the report will contain information about the chart or charts used by the vessel at the time of the incident, and also expects the report to describe what features were present on the charts being used.

“The UKHO does not wish to prejudice the investigation, and so will not enter into speculation about which chart may have been in use by the vessel at the time of the incident.

“The UKHO’s most detailed paper chart of the area in which the vessel grounded is Chart 1999 at a scale of 1:300 000, which is up to date for all relevant information known to the UKHO. It should be noted that this small scale chart is considered to be unsuitable for close inshore navigation.

“Larger scale paper charts, produced by the Italian hydrographic service, are available. The official digital charts are Italian with larger scales available.”

Link to Original Article on Lloyds List :http://www.lloydslist.com/ll/sector/ship-operations/article389069.ece

YouTube Video of Costa Concordia Sail Past at Giglio Island in August 2011  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKJszx8NgMY

Read Full Post »


Costa Concordia: Rock Not Charted or Erraneous Navigation

16/01/2012

On Friday evening 13th January 2012, the cruiseliner Costa Concordia grounded near the Italian island Giglio after hitting an underwater rock. This tragic event caused various questions whether the ship was navigating too close to the shore and if the rock was properly charted.
The vessel was in touristic navigation, passing by the picturesque island Giglio. This is a manoeuvre which is done from time to time. However, this time, the vessel approached the coast with the dangerous Le Scole reef area very close. The minimum distance to the shore usually is a couple of miles. Even inhabitants of the islands made a remark of the cruiseship to be closer than usual.According to several sources, the captain of the Costa Concordia stated that the rock the ship hit was not charted. The vessel has a draught of 8.2m and sailing approximately 300m out of the shore and the rocks. The area is said to be well charted and the place is used for diving and sailing which makes it well-known.It is not completely clear where the Costa Concordia hit the rock. According to AIS sources, the vessel may have tried to navigate between two rocks with a depth of 10.3m. After the incident, the vessel navigated close to the shore, towards the harbour. When turning, the vessel made a list, which was critical looking at the shallow waters.The position is not stable on Monday 16thJanuary 2012 the Costa Concordia made a move of 9cm downwards. If this continues, for example caused by bad weather, she may even slide from the rock, potentially to a depth of 100m.Link to Original Article : http://www.hydro-international.com/news/id5284-Costa_Concordia_Rock_Not_Charted_or_Erraneous_Navigation.html

Read Full Post »