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Posts Tagged ‘costa concordia’


As Powerboaters we all know Power gives way to Sail, but not a 130,000 Ton Cruiseliner to a 15 Ton Sailboat. Get Real !

There is a Video on You Tube of just such a circumstance, as a Sailboat holds his heading to pass just in front of the bow of a Cruiseliner, as captured in the pictures below.

Just in case you think there is a bit of Camera Zoom magic here…..

And again…

Is that close enough for you…..

They don’t seem too worried about it onboard…

The audio is all in Italian, as are the notes on You Tube, so I dont know what they said. I’ve seen a translation that seems to say the crossing was “agreed” between the Cruise ship and the Sail boat, but come on, that is awfully close !

The What If’s just jump straight up like, ‘What if the wind died’, or they just ‘Hit a wind hole’ or a ‘rope parted’. It certainly doesnt look like the sailboat engine is on to help.

In any case they made it, and by the look of it they are all Proud as Punch.

It so easily could have ended up differently.

Here is the link to watch it on You Tube. for yourself.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5wAn0ObKCY&feature=plcp

Remember there are no Traffic Lights at Sea !

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The Boat is sold and delivered. That’s all good and all part of the plan, but a few irks !

After I bought the boat (ordered 2006, delivered 2007) I bought an apartment (2007) next to the Marina I kept the boat at. I always dreamed of living there and being able to look out the window to see how the boat was doing. Well I had to wait five years for the builder to complete all 1,100 apartments of the development, and in any case I’d decided to rent out the place, and well now the boat is Sold.

However now I see the new owner keeps her in the same Marina, in a berth just right in front of my apartment balcony !

Anyway no hard feelings, she is a great boat and she served me well for more than five years.

Why sell her then ? Well boating ideas change, and as boats get older they need more maintenance, and breakdowns will become more of a nuisance.

There is a phrase you often see on Yachtworld or anywhere with Used Boat ads, “Better than New”, that always means that the owner has “broken her in” and well ….fixed everything that crapped out for whatever reason after the boat was delivered.

I guess in the US or Australia, you just call the dealer and set a date for them to drop by to take a look. But when you buy direct from the Manufacturer, and they don’t have any servicing agent where you are based, well you deal with it yourself, and frankly that is the way I prefer it.

To their credit whenever I had a failure of an item under warranty (and even outside warranty), if they could, then Maritimo Australia would just send me a replacement by courier; No Questions.

But obviously there are times with things that you just have to deal with it yourself. I’ve done that for five years, and in the process always fixed or repaired/replaced anything that was broken or just wasn’t quite right. That might mean I fixed it or I got the guys whose work I trust to get onboard and work on it. (Well actually more of the latter)

I’ve always also determined that the boat should be kept clean and the Hull well polished. Gel coat is meant to shine so you can see your reflection ! That’s a lot of work, and mostly all done by hired help, but I think it’s worth it. Also she has been lifted out every year and antifouled regardless. Engines serviced with Lubes & all Filters changed annually regardless of the hours, and done by the Caterpillar agent.

Again that is a lot of work and expense, but when you go out in your boat, you want to be confident and relaxed that everything is in the best shape.

Is it all worth it ?

Obviously the guy who bought her thinks so, given he came up with a winning offer.

Good luck to him and I hope he has an enjoyable ownership of her. I believe she will be used by his family mostly for fishing around the region. He’s keeping the name AVA LON, which I like as there a strong reason behind the name, and that way I will always have a connection with her.

To the new owners, Fair Winds & Tight Lines !

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I have uploaded a copy of a Video which it’s believed shows the actual track of the Costa Concordia on her last fateful voyage on Friday the 13th.

It clearly shows whoever was in control of the vessel did not allow for or anticipate the turn that she would make.

Sadly ships over 290m in length and over 114,000 GT don’t handle like sports cruisers or speedboats !

Here’s the link to the Video   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5tTMJUKjTM

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Exclusive: Costa Concordia in previous close call – FREE CONTENT

Wednesday 18 January 2012, 00:30

by Wally Mandryk and David Osler

Data provided by Lloyd’s List Intelligence

But cruise line insists Friday’s deviation from route was unauthorised

EXCLUSIVE analysis of Lloyd’s List Intelligence tracking data shows that Costa Concordia sailed within 230 m of the coast of Giglio Island on a previous voyage, slightly closer to the shore than where it subsequently hit rocks on Friday.

The cruiseship, which capsized off the Italian coast, had previously changed course to get closer to Giglio on the night of August 14 last year — for La Notte di San Lorenzo, the night of the shooting stars, owners Costa Cruises have said.

Speaking at a news conference on Monday, the company’s chief executive officer, Pier Luigi Foschi, stressed that the decision was taken under the authorisation of the local martime authority and the permission of Costa, after the route was reviewed. He also claimed that the vessel was never closer than 500 metres from the coast at any pont in the voyage.

The route taken on January 13, however, was described by Costa Cruises as a deviation from the pre-planned route to make a manoeuvre that was “unauthorised, unapproved and unknown to Costa”.

Both routes passed within a few hundred metres of each other and the tracking data, obtained through Lloyd’s List Intelligence proprietary land based AIS receivers, proves that the vessel would have been less than 200 m away from the point of collision when it took the previously authorised route. The route also took the vessel far closer than the 500 metres claimed by Costa Crociere.

Meanwhile, the UK Hydrographic Office has issued a statement, declining to comment on whether Costa Concordia was using one of its charts.

However, UKHO has confirmed that Italian charts of the area around Giglio are available on a larger scale than the 1:300,000 charts it issues.

Although this might seem to be a technical matter, the master of the vessel, who is under investigation for suspected manslaughter, has blamed the casualty on the cruiseship hitting an uncharted rock. This could make charts critical to the case for the defence, should the master face a criminal prosecution.

No rock is shown on the UKHO chart at the position in which Costa Concordia sank.

The UKHO said: “This is a regrettable incident where life was lost and a full investigation will be undertaken by the Italian maritime authorities. A report will be published following that investigation.

“The UKHO expects that the report will contain information about the chart or charts used by the vessel at the time of the incident, and also expects the report to describe what features were present on the charts being used.

“The UKHO does not wish to prejudice the investigation, and so will not enter into speculation about which chart may have been in use by the vessel at the time of the incident.

“The UKHO’s most detailed paper chart of the area in which the vessel grounded is Chart 1999 at a scale of 1:300 000, which is up to date for all relevant information known to the UKHO. It should be noted that this small scale chart is considered to be unsuitable for close inshore navigation.

“Larger scale paper charts, produced by the Italian hydrographic service, are available. The official digital charts are Italian with larger scales available.”

Link to Original Article on Lloyds List :http://www.lloydslist.com/ll/sector/ship-operations/article389069.ece

YouTube Video of Costa Concordia Sail Past at Giglio Island in August 2011  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKJszx8NgMY

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Costa Concordia: Rock Not Charted or Erraneous Navigation

16/01/2012

On Friday evening 13th January 2012, the cruiseliner Costa Concordia grounded near the Italian island Giglio after hitting an underwater rock. This tragic event caused various questions whether the ship was navigating too close to the shore and if the rock was properly charted.
The vessel was in touristic navigation, passing by the picturesque island Giglio. This is a manoeuvre which is done from time to time. However, this time, the vessel approached the coast with the dangerous Le Scole reef area very close. The minimum distance to the shore usually is a couple of miles. Even inhabitants of the islands made a remark of the cruiseship to be closer than usual.According to several sources, the captain of the Costa Concordia stated that the rock the ship hit was not charted. The vessel has a draught of 8.2m and sailing approximately 300m out of the shore and the rocks. The area is said to be well charted and the place is used for diving and sailing which makes it well-known.It is not completely clear where the Costa Concordia hit the rock. According to AIS sources, the vessel may have tried to navigate between two rocks with a depth of 10.3m. After the incident, the vessel navigated close to the shore, towards the harbour. When turning, the vessel made a list, which was critical looking at the shallow waters.The position is not stable on Monday 16thJanuary 2012 the Costa Concordia made a move of 9cm downwards. If this continues, for example caused by bad weather, she may even slide from the rock, potentially to a depth of 100m.Link to Original Article : http://www.hydro-international.com/news/id5284-Costa_Concordia_Rock_Not_Charted_or_Erraneous_Navigation.html

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