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Dec 2013 STOP PRESS : Update : HanseYachts buys Sealine  :  https://maritimo48.com/2013/12/22/hanseyachts-buys-sealine/

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Original Story May 3013

It’s old news (from May 1st apparently) but it seems that Sealine the UK based boat manufacturer that has had a bit of a renaissance over the last few years with some interesting models and design features has gone into administration. The much vaunted “recovery” in boat sales came a bit to late for this brand. Problems in achieving Sales perhaps coming from the change in type of boats buyers are looking for nowadays ?

Here are some Press Reports on Sealine’s demise from around the web.

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Private equity-backed yacht builder Sealine goes bust

1 May 2013

US-based private equity firm Oxford Investment Group has failed to turn around luxury yachts builder Sealine International, which has collapsed into administration.

Graham Bushby and Guy Mander of Baker Tilly Restructuring and Recovery will now take over as joint administrators of the West Midlands-based business.

Sealine has underperformed for a number of years. In 2011, the company posted a £4m loss on revenues of £33m.

Oxford acquired Sealine in August that year and said it would work on expanding the business.

Baker Tilly partner Graham Bushby said, “We appreciate that there will be great uncertainty among staff and we will endeavour to update them at the earliest opportunity.

“We will also be working to maximise recoveries for the company’s creditors, which includes the sale of plant and recovery of monies owed to the business.”

Oxford, which is headquartered in La Jolla, California, targets underperforming or growth companies with revenues of over $20m in the US, Western Europe, Australia and China.

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Sealine boat builders: 234 made redundant

Sealine factory in Kidderminster
Sealine has been trading from Kidderminster for over 40 years

Administrators at a Worcestershire luxury boat company have issued redundancy notices to 234 staff.

Sealine in Kidderminster is one of Europe’s biggest makers of boats.

Baker Tilly Restructuring and Recovery LLP said it was assisting staff “to make claims against the government redundancy fund”.

Sealine has been trading since 1972. It was bought by the Brunswick Corporation in 2001 and was sold to another US firm, Oxford Investment Group, in 2011.

Administrator Graham Bushby said: “We will also be working to maximise recoveries for the company’s creditors, which includes the sale of plant and recovery of monies owed to the business.”

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May 16, 2013 10:59 am

Firms throw new jobs lifeline to axed workers at Sealine boat company

Workers axed by luxury Midland boat maker Sealine are being thrown a lifeline from companies far and wide who are seeking skilled engineers.

Major yacht-builders Sunseeker, in Dorset, have told Wyre Forest MP Mark Garnier they are keen to recruit up to 82 skilled marine engineers and boat-builders from the 234 staff made redundant from Sealine, in Kidderminster, two weeks ago.

While Jaguar Land Rover have contacted the Community Union inquiring about maintenance technicians and engineers for its plant in Castle Bromwich.

Hatt Kitchens, in Hartlebury, have also requested carpenters through the Job Centre, while Cab Automotive, in Tipton, and Breakwells, in Kidderminster, are looking for drivers.

Sunseeker and Jaguar Land Rover are among the firms which will send representatives to a jobs fair at Kidderminster Town Hall between 10am and 2pm on June 7.

MP Mark Garnier, who is spearheading the fair, said: “What is fascinating is that we have been taking calls from Sunseeker and Jaguar Land Rover who are seeking skilled workers.

“I am quite optimistic that these workers from Sealine will be picked up quickly by other companies.

“We now have 40 companies represented who will be showcasing themselves at the fair and seeking to take on workers. We expect about 300 to 400 jobs to be on offer.”

Baker Tilly Restructuring and Recovery was appointed administrators for Sealine following the announcement of their collapse.

Spokesman Frank Shepherd said they had already received interest from 50 parties, with some shown round the site, but said there was no further update.

He said: “We have shown people around the Kidderminster site and have received an encouraging level of interest.

“We are hopeful of a sale but there are never any guarantees.”

Meanwhile workers from Sealine are battling for compensation.

More than 100 workers made redundant by the Kidderminster firm packed a meeting organised by the Community Union last week.

Officials are now applying for a protected award on behalf of the 234 staff and will also pursue unfair dismissal claims.

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Now I know why Maritimo has done so well over the last ten years.

They have cloned Bill Barry-Cotter………

ALT_VI~1

The real story that goes with this photo is on the Maritimo web site as follows  http://www.maritimo.com.au/news-events/news/2013/new-maritimomustang-dealers-for-victoria.aspx

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NEW MARITIMO/MUSTANG DEALERS FOR VICTORIA

02/05/2013

Two of Victoria’s longest established marine industry identities, Tim Pratt and Andrew Burns, have joined forces in a new venture called Victorian Boat Sales, which will be the official Maritimo and Mustang dealership in the State.

Maritimo sales and marketing manager Greg Haines said the company was delighted with the appointment and was confident that the duo would see a significant lift in the number of Maritimo and Mustang vessels sold in Victoria.

“Tim and Andrew have been around the marine industry for many years and their expertise, professionalism and network of contacts will be invaluable for us as we continue to expand our business,” he said.

“They pride themselves on honesty and customer service so they fit perfectly with our corporate philosophy.”

Victorian Boat Sales is located at the Patterson Lakes Marina and is a Boating Industry Association Member. The company has on site qualified marine engineers and antifouling, detailing and fibreglass capabilities.

Tim Pratt was 17 years with JV Marine where he was responsible for the Mustang brand.  He then started work with Mustang Victoria, a direct factory owned dealership and following a year there he owned and operated Patterson Lakes Boat Sales for the past three years.

Andrew Burns was with JV Marine for 23 years, also involved with Mustang and senior management and spent the last five years with R Marine Jacksons-Victoria Riviera dealership.

“We launched Victorian Boat Sales in late March and we are delighted to have been able to secure the dealership for Maritimo and Mustang in Victoria,” said Tim.

“We are very familiar with both brands and we know the quality and the integrity that they represent so for us it is a perfect fit.”

VBS is a Club Marine insurance agents and also offers competitive boat finance.

“We also include full tuition for buyers of all vessels sold and pride ourselves on honesty and ethical dealings with all customers or prospective customers,” said Tim.

VBS representation of the Maritimo and Mustang brands in Victoria is effective immediately

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To mark Maritimo’s first decade, Boatpoint   http://www.boatpoint.com.au/news/2013/maritimo%e2%80%99s-10th-anniversary-36631  conducted this exclusive interview with founding boat builder and doyen, Bill Barry-Cotter.

For anybody that doesn’t know, Barry-Cotter, is the granddaddy of Australian boat building, having started and sold marques such as Mariner & Riviera. He has been doing it for around 50 years so he really knows a thing or two about what buyers want and “the Business”

Here is the article from Boatpoint.

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Q. Looking back at the first Maritimo you launched, the 60 with or without walkthrough flying bridge, back in Sydney a decade ago — did you ever imagine then that you would be in the position you are today, building the kinds of boats you are now, so well established and with a strong following?

A. No. I really didn’t envisage we would grow as we have. I thought we’d build a few boats and built them properly. That got out of hand and we were making too many before the GFC came along.

The public received our boats really well. The early Maritimo was a practical cruising boat. Good performance. Reasonably fuel efficient. Well built. And well finished.

It was modelled to some degree on the Riviera 46. I had a couple of them myself and I always liked the boat. I also had the last 52 Hatteras we built [under licence]. The thing I missed with that Hatteras was the walkaround decks. So I included those and added features of the Hatteras to make the Maritimo 60.

There was also a restraint of trade with Riviera, after I sold the company, that meant I couldn’t build anything that they had or hadn’t built for seven years so I deliberately picked that kind of boat because they didn’t build one.

The name Maritimo known came about after [wife] Lesley and I were away, we were staying in the Maritim hotel in Germany and then we went to Portugal to the Maritim railway station. We chucked that name around, in Spanish and Italian it means “at sea” and is actually pronounced Ma-rit-imo.

Like most boat builders, the market was flying along till the GFC in say 2008. In the previous boom time, how many boats were you building a year, what percentage were exports, how many people did you have working for you?

The best we did was 78 boats a year. We had 480 people working for us (Riviera had 1200 at the same time). Then after the GFC hit 1600 people disappeared from the Coomera Marine Precinct. That’s direct employed people. Media and government weren’t interested in the problem. No-one cared.

But things are starting pick up again. We were exporting the same percentage then as now — about 55-65 per cent.

How many Maritimo boats have you built all told up until now? What is the current annual target and is Maritimo profitable operating on that basis?

All told, as a close guess, just under or just over 500. Current target now is to try and do 22-25 Maritimos a year. As it picks up I just want to keep it at that. I want to build boats the best we can build them. It’s just not worth the drama of cranking it all up again. Oh, and to that you can add another dozen or so Mustangs.

What’s the all-time best-seller?
The 48. We did 108 of them. And it arrived towards the end of the boom. The 48 has always been a best seller. It will become a classic Maritimo. I did a lot of work on that. I looked at second-hand prices and did a lot of work on trade-in price before our new M50 is released (this week). The 48 is holding its value well. We’ve sold a couple of late-model ones, the Sky Lounge ones, for up to $980K and another one went for same kind of money.

How has the new-boat buyer changed in the new market, ever since the GFC?

The interesting thing with that is there were two distinct markets for boats: old customer who I sold [Mariner] Pacers to 35-40 years ago who had a lot of boats. They know what they want, they are very conservative people and well informed. In boom days that was half our market.

Then you had the stock broker, the property developer who made a lot of money quickly. They would buy the Cabriolets and all the sporty stuff but really didn’t know anything about boating and were more interested in price than quality and boat.

The old customer that we’ve had forever represent 60 to 65 per cent of boats we now sell. I’m happy building for those old customers because you know the people and know what they want.

We just sold a 53 to a good old customer. This is his third Maritimo, he had two 60s before and bought a 53 Cabriolet because he lives beyond a [low] bridge. He came in every Friday afternoon to go through the boat.

He then came on a Saturday morning and he’d arrive at 8am and leave 30 minutes later than rest of the gang in the afternoon and was here for the whole build of his boat. He’s really happy and we’ll have less problem with him that anyone.

What is the single biggest change you’ve seen to the luxury motorcruiser or powerboat market in the last decade?
What has happened, and it is really now starting to help us, particularly with the US, is that buyers are no longer asking “can we get a bigger engine?”

Now they ask how much fuel does it use? All the focus and research is into fuel use. We’re very fuel efficient and that has helped us and got us going to make our boats more and more fuel efficient. It’s a work in progress.

In almost any boat we’re better than pod drives or IPS with our conventional shafts. Now what I’m doing, a lot of work with Volvo, is to drive that further to make our boats even more efficient.

If you can pick up two per cent there’s a huge gain… we’ve been picking that up each year and will keep driving that forward. I look forward to fiddling with some hulls to see if we can get a break through.
In the 50-odd years (apprentice shipwright in 1960, built first Mariner in 1966) or so that you’ve been building boats, is the current climate as tough as you’ve ever seen it?

It is actually. There was a period with Gough Whitlam in ’74. He destroyed the export market. It was tough but nowhere near as tough and as long as this time.

How do you think you can attract future boaters to the Maritimo brand?

The only way I think of doing this is to follow the old customers over those 50 years and see if I can sell them a Maritimo. I had lunch with a customer today who had bought two or three boats off me. I personally sold him his first boat, a Mariner 30, and he gave me a photo of me launching that old boat behind my Falcon GT.

He got out of boating for a few years and now he’s talking about buying a boat and using it for cruising up and down the coast… exactly what Maritimos are good for.

What are your boats’ most significant points of difference compared with your competitors?

To me, it’s the concept of the boat, the enclosed flybridge, the whole boat is designed around cruising and living aboard, it’s easier to get around, they’re walkaround boats with internal stairs that make it practical, and the engineering gear you can get to. I try and keep the simplicity, too. Then there is the fuel efficiency.

Clearly, some big European companies are able to build boats a lot cheaper than we can these days. But are they better? What would you say to local boat buyers shopping on price alone?

The best answer to that is that we sold a Maritimo 48 to a customer in the Seychelles and we flew over for the handover on the boat and the bloke doing the handover explained that the European boats in the Seychelles, the things just fall apart in 18 months. A bit of rough water and the humidity and they just rot away.

Riviera and Maritimo are good tough, long lasting boats.

My answer with anybody with that big, cheap, imported stuff is we can’t even trade it. We can’t get a wholesaler who will buy it.

But if it’s a Caribbean, a Riviera or a Maritimo we can get a price on it. In four to six weeks it’s gone.

So some of this stuff just isn’t cheap when you look at their resale or trade-in price if they can get it. Some owners are getting between half and one-third what they paid for almost-new boats.

And there’s the issue on noncompliance with engines and unsaleable boats that arrive here and can’t be sold back overseas.

Do you see demand for your boats and exports picking up in the near future given the currency correction? What percentage of your production do you hope to export in general in the coming years?

It’s tough on the export front but the US is still our best export market. Where we used to be cheap we’re now very expensive. But again we’re getting the buyer who wants to go cruising and he gets what he wants. We even change layouts, it’s difficult, but that’s what you have to do, and everyone’s happy.

How have you improved the quality of your boats in recent years?

We use independent surveyors. That has worked better than anything. We had internal QC people and a qualified engineer working on all the compliance. Because of the downturn we had to let go all of those people. So I got outside surveyors.

This cost me less money but it is the best thing I’ve ever done. The two surveyors we are working with now are doing a fantastic job. They are uncompromising and just don’t let boats go unless they are fixed properly before leaving the factory.

It really has saved us money, made a better product, and made even happier customers.

Do you see the new cruiser market ever getting back to where it was pre-GFC?

No. I think that was a once-in-a-lifetime period. Today you can’t give away a new game-fishing boat. We sold a 470 Convertible a few weeks ago but the whole game fishing thing is very slow and it’s more to cruising these days.

Even in the U.S. it’s that way. An American said to me in his broad accent the other day, he said, the customer would rather spend three weeks in the Bahamas cruising than have his friends turn his nose up at him for going fishing.

Although your bid for Riviera a year or so ago wasn’t accepted, do you think there’s still room for both boat builders and brands in Australia?

It’s probably good for the customer but from a business point of view…

But some say I should be glad I didn’t get it as the market turned down even more. I’ve even been congratulated for not getting it. Three months later I was glad I didn’t get it.

In the U.S., in the hey day, we [Riviera at the time] were building more fish boats than Ocean, Hatteras and Viking combined. That market has gone.

Do you foresee a time when you retire from boat building and, if so, what are the plans for Maritimo in the future.

I’ve had a few people falling off around me and you have to think about it. What I’ll do in the next three, four or five years is probably do a deal with some guys internally and probably give them a share and build the transition that way.

But for now I’m sticking with it. And our new M50 and S50 are great boats and part of the current evolution to build better and better boats.

Thanks for your time and all the very best for Maritimo in the next decade…

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Here is a photo below of the beautiful Maritimo 48 that I bought from him way back in 2006, Hull Number M48/16.

Great boat & Great times !

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Not the beach view anyone wants

These are just my own personal ramblings about an incident that has caused a sickening loss of life. My heart goes out to the families and friends of those who perished, as well as the survivors who will doubtless relive those terrifying events in their minds eye for many years to come.

From every marine accident there is an investigation and from every investigation there are conclusions. Such investigations are not tasked with prosecuting the guilty, they are simply to find the facts of what happened and why it happened, so that where required, systems or procedures or equipment can be changed or modified to try to ensure the same thing will not happen again.

The relevant police authorities will make their own enquiries to deal with the facts of suspected liability and guilt. Thereafter the relevant legal jurisdiction will act accordingly on the matter.

But more than that, after an incident like this with such a tragic loss of life, surely in many maritime regions and territories, the relevant persons are asking: Could this happen here ?

That is a question to which I believe there is no “Yes or No” answer, but there are a lot of things to consider.

There is a simple and chilling fact; any accident at sea or elsewhere is analogous to a chemical reaction, if you allow the dangerous mix of ingredients into the same place at the same time then there may well be a violent reaction.

If you can keep them separate, then hopefully nothing happens. In many accidents at sea the ‘ingredients’ are speed, complacency, poor lookout, visibility and navigation, systems failure, and the unexpected.

As to the question; Could it happen in Singapore ? well it could, but in my opinion, it’s very unlikley, and here’s why.

Firstly the relevant Goverment Agency, the Maritime & Port Authority, MPA, has been very active for many years in “managing” the operation of ferry traffic in Singapore. One of the major features of this is that all ferries are required to follow demarcated routes into and out of, and through Singapore waters, and the routes are well defined and well known by near all users. In addition these ferries are required to adhere to set day & night speed limits for the routes in the direct approaches. Consequently if you are at sea in those corridoors at night, then you expect to meet ferry traffic, and at 12 knots you have a bit of time to spot them, and navigate out of their way.

Just One of the Designated Ferry Routes

It’s worthwhile to note that these routes and speed regulations have been in place for around ten years. Also be assured that they have added time and distance onto each and every journey. I can remember some journeys being around 15 minutes quicker. It was also strange to watch as a ferry gets further away from the destination to follow the route.

Secondly the Police Coastguard has a large presence on the water with a large number or active patrol craft throughout Singapore waters. Whilst they have a multitude of roles, they would seem to keep some form of watch of ferry and private and passenger traffic. This is part deterant, and part Big Brother to make sure that maritime rules and laws are followed.

At a location near you ?

Thirdly, major events such as fireworks, or yacht races or waterborne events, etc. likely dont draw the same volume of on-water spectators in Singapore as perhaps as in cities like Hong Kong, Auckland or wherever. Also Fireworks in Singapore are within sheltered or enclosed waterways, and can be easily, and best viewed from onshore. Just look at any National Day, F1, or New Years event video to see what I mean. Obviously Fireworks are at night, which immediately brings navigational and lookout issues.

Victoria Harbour Fireworks

Fourthly and importantly, the MPA many years ago implemented a scheme of ensuring each and every craft on the water has some form of AIS or HARTS, (Harbour Craft Transponder System) on board. This in effect enables the MPA Port Operations to monitor the location and speed and heading of every craft on the water, if in fact they have the time, the interest and manpower to do that. (Note they’ve just upgraded their system to handle 10,000 vessel tracks at any one time ! Click on photo to follow link to read the release.)

WOW just upgraded, they can handle 10,000 vessel tracks at any given time ! Click to follow link !

In addition there is any number of MPA Pilot boats, and MPA launches out and on the water. There is also the system of Cruising permit application process for Non Singapore registered pleasure craft vessels, which requires approval for their route and schedule for any given cruise.

Perhaps lastly there is the issue of geography and layout. Singapore has a defined and ‘regular’ coastline, and a small number of islands with ferry access, with defined routes of access to and from. Reclamation has played a big role and Islands have been dredged, linked, joined, connected and amalgamated for the use by Indutstry, Military and Leisure/Property Development. In some cases bridges and roads have been built for access, negating the use of ferries.

Other than that, and significantly, the regional ferry traffic has to be very much less than in Hong Kong.

A lot of sea room there. Easier to miss than have a collision

Indicative only. Believe accident site was close to NW tip of Lamma Island.

The investigation is underway in Hong Kong, and the families of the perished will be waiting for those conclusions, to answer the question of “How could this happen”, but the likelyhood is that is that this will all come down to those ingredients mentioned above.

If there is however one immediate lesson to be learned from this whole affair so far, it is the conclusion from the photos below.

It’s a bit unfair to make this comparision as I dont know the standards that each vessel was built to, but the immediate reaction is that one sank, and one made it to the dock, presumed to be under it’s own power.

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The conclusion ? Travel by Catamaran !

Two Hulls = Two Chances !

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Image Source : BBC, SCMP, ST, online news outlets, etc.

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As Powerboaters we all know Power gives way to Sail, but not a 130,000 Ton Cruiseliner to a 15 Ton Sailboat. Get Real !

There is a Video on You Tube of just such a circumstance, as a Sailboat holds his heading to pass just in front of the bow of a Cruiseliner, as captured in the pictures below.

Just in case you think there is a bit of Camera Zoom magic here…..

And again…

Is that close enough for you…..

They don’t seem too worried about it onboard…

The audio is all in Italian, as are the notes on You Tube, so I dont know what they said. I’ve seen a translation that seems to say the crossing was “agreed” between the Cruise ship and the Sail boat, but come on, that is awfully close !

The What If’s just jump straight up like, ‘What if the wind died’, or they just ‘Hit a wind hole’ or a ‘rope parted’. It certainly doesnt look like the sailboat engine is on to help.

In any case they made it, and by the look of it they are all Proud as Punch.

It so easily could have ended up differently.

Here is the link to watch it on You Tube. for yourself.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5wAn0ObKCY&feature=plcp

Remember there are no Traffic Lights at Sea !

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Back in January 2012 when Ferretti announced the sale to Shandong Heavy Industry Group Co I wondered how long it would take. Now here is the answer !

Below are extracts of various articles from Boat World and other Boating publications.

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Ferretti Group, whose Riva unit made boats for Brigitte Bardot and Sean Connery, intends to open an assembly plant in China as its new Chinese parent seeks to drive up sales in the world’s most-populous country.

The Italian yacht maker is considering plans for the facility in Qingdao, Shandong province, Tan Xuguang, chairman of the company and of its majority-owner Shandong Heavy Industry Group-Weichai Group, told reporters in Beijing yesterday. The plant will customise vessels for the local market, he added.

Ferretti plans to boost sales in emerging markets led by China, Brazil and Russia, Mr Tan said, as the eurozone debt crisis saps demand in Europe. Shandong Heavy, China’s biggest maker of bulldozers, (Yes Bulldozers & Yachts the new Vertical Integration!) agreed to buy 75 per cent of the yacht maker from creditors in January for 178 million euros (S$280 million).

http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/premium/transport-hub/shipping/yacht-maker-ferretti-plans-open-china-plant-20120829

S-W Asia Editor’s note The Ferretti Group, in case you missed it, is a great deal more than Riva. The Group involves eight brands:

  • Ferretti – deluxe motoryachts, 15-27m
  • Pershing – high performance, high luxe, 15-35m
  • Itama – motoryachts 13-24m
  • Bertram – sport fisherman boats, 11-24m
  • Riva – open launches and flybridge cruisers, 8-35m
  • Mochi Craft – ‘lobster boats’ (its a styling thing), 12-23m
  • CRN – fully custom built aluminium megayachts, 44-90m
  • Custom Line – grp maxiyachts, 26-38m

A couple of years ago Ferretti got into a lot of hot financial water when the private equity company that owned a chunk of the business decided that it was worth nothing. Norberto Ferretti, founder of the original brand and of the Group, had to do a lot of monetary gymnastics to regain control and stop the whole thing being shut down.

Since then, business has not improved in Europe and North America, the traditional markets of the European luxury boat builders. Like everyone else, Asia (and in particular China) is being seen as The Big Market to get into. Many manufacturers have found out already that the Asian perception of boating is not quite the same as it is ‘back home’. ‘It’s a market, Jim, but not as we know it’.

European boat owners and charterers treasure their floating hotels for the peace and privacy they permit – the ‘exclusive getaway’ sort of programme. In Asia there is little point in having a big expensive boat if you don’t show it off – preferably tied up to the dock where everyone can see it – and there is no need to venture out onto that nasty, rolly, bumpy stuff, the sea. (Sooooo true)

It will be interesting to see what Ferretti China comes up with by way of ‘customising for the local market’. We know a boat builder who was quite flabbergasted when asked to build an 80′ luxury motor yacht – with one saloon/bar space (no dining facilities or galley required), a giant karaoke lounge complete with mirrored ceilings and disco-ball decor, and just one large stateroom (wonder what that was going to be used for?). And most importantly, a generator BUT NO ENGINES.

We will be watching Ferretti’s China output with great interest.

by BusinessTimes.com.sg

Unquote

That’s it I am buying a Princess Yacht now !

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Came upon this interesting take on “Boat Asia 2012”, with some nice photos. I did’nt make it along to the show so interesting to get this persons account on the show. Must say it looks like the 2012 edition was quite a bit smaller than previous years shows. All credits to http://ponderouspilgrim.wordpress.com for the article and photos. Suggest you head over there to read the article in full and see all the photos in full detail.

The Ponderous Pilgrim

Reflections condominium, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BayBoat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay
Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BayBeneteau First 40.7, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay

Reflections at Keppel Bay condominium overlooking Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay, Keppel Island. Was pleased to see the French Beneteau First 40.7 i spent 5 days on for my RYA competent crew cert.

Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BayGolf Clubs, Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay
Bed Room, Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BayBath room, Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay
Bath Tub, Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BayPGA Championship Room, Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay
PGA Championship Room, Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BayBathroom, Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay
Sea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BaySea Bear, Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay

There was a long queue to see the Westport 130 christened “Sea Bear” which used to be owned by Jack Nicklaus (a visiting teen, unable to distinguish the two, thought it was Jack Nicholson’s). Decent enough interior, though “golf museum” it isn’t really, unless you count a bunch of clubs and rooms named after championships. We weren’t allowed to see the pilot house, which i was most curious about. For sale at S$60 million or rent.

The rest of the boats were rather entry-level crafts, probably pitched at the tentative new boat owner.

Boat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel BayBoat Asia 2012, Marina @ Keppel Bay

Sealine F42 and Sealine SC35, the latter being an entry-level ship. I thought the former quite practically-designed – decent…

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