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Team Oracle USA

I thought that he was just full of Bull when he was spouting off about the “greatest sporting comeback”, but it seems very likely that he will do just that.

His 72ft CAT now has an extra gear over the Kiwi’s, especially upwind.

I think the Kiwi’s, like me, must have fallen into the trap of “don’t worry the odds are staked in our favour; we just need one point”

Well its nearly over. One Race. One Winner. One Loser.

Fat Lady please get ready.

The America’s Cup seems set to be ‘mainstream sports’ at least for a day.

May the best team win.

That’s still the Kiwi’s by the way.

Team Oracle USA (money no object; Larry) must have spent a fortune.

If they keep the Cup then more of the same. Next time there may only be one challenger who can afford the costs.

If the Kiwi’s win then there is a chance the sport can perhaps get back to a more even handed approach.

Come on KIWI’s !!!!!!!!

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Ocean Pearl @ Anchor

Proud Owners

For all those wondering what happened to the GREY PEARL owners, they have just crossed the North Atlantic in their Nordhavn 64 “OCEAN PEARL”

Follow their Blog at http://www.oceanpearlyacht.com/aspx/m/Ocean-Pearl-Blog

They departed St. John’s, Newfoundland in early July and arrived in Crookhaven Ireland nine days later.

Crookhaven Arrival

Arrival Crookhaven

Ocean Passage

Ocean Route

They are expected to cruise Ireland & Scotland before possibly heading further north ?

Is there a GSSR reunion on the cards ?

Ocean Pearl

Grey Pearl lives on

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Boating industry websites are reporting the following story.

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倪浩 Sunseeker

UK boatbuilder Sunseeker is in talks with a prospective Chinese owner, Chinese property firm Dalian Wanda, in a deal worth US$471m. Subject to regulatory approval, the purchase is imminent. ‘We are buying the best yacht company in the UK,’ Wang Jianlin, chairman of Beijing-based Dalian Wanda, was quoted as saying. If the deal is concluded, new investment will be forthcoming from the existing management and founder Robert Braithwaite.

Stewart McIntyre, Sunseeker’s CEO, said, ‘The discussions are ongoing and I cannot add any more. If they are successful it will not be a matter of months before reaching an outcome. Nothing will change. The current management team will remain including founder Robert Braithwaite. That was a pre-requisite for the talks going ahead.’

McIntyre declined to comment on reports that the possible purchaser is the Chinese group Dalian Wanda, the same company that McIntyre told IBI a few weeks ago was buying into Sunseeker China, one of the two Chinese mainland distributors of Sunseekers. On the prospect that these talks might draw other potential buyers, McIntyre said: ‘We will not be talking with anyone else.’

Gordon Hui of Hong Kong-based Sunseeker Asia, one of the top Sunseeker dealers in the world, pointed out that ‘This is a great step. I am delighted. The company is going to benefit from a huge boost in R&D. Wang Jianlin is himself a Sunseeker owner.’

The Sunseeker statement confirmed: ‘Sunseeker will remain a British company, headquartered in Poole, Dorset and will maintain its existing primary production bases in the UK, along with its current workforce and infrastructure. The existing management team and representatives of FL Partners will remain on the Sunseeker Boards, and founder Robert Braithwaite will continue to be involved in the business and remain as Group President.

‘The new majority shareholder, who has no current interest in the luxury motor yacht sector, supports Sunseeker’s commitment to superior products and its premium brand, both of which would be further enhanced by its investment,’ Sunseeker said.

‘If a deal is concluded, it will be fantastic news for the business, the wider Sunseeker ‘family’ and the motor yacht industry and will allow Sunseeker to expand its global base still further while retaining its current operational and manufacturing infrastructure at our headquarters in Poole.’

This isn’t the first move by a big Chinese firm into the luxury yacht sector – in January 2012, the Ferretti Group was sold to Shandong Heavy Industry Group-Weichai Group in a deal worth around €178 million.

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Nǐ hǎo – Suunseeker

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If you have any interest in sailing or just like doing anything on or in the sea, take a look at the Video Tribute to Andrew ‘Bart’ Simspon, the British sailor that died as a result of the capsize of the Artemis Americas Cup yacht during practice in San Francisco Bay in early May 2013.

He seems to have been a larger than life, genuine good guy, that won an Olympic Gold medal, but remained an ordinary ‘bloke’ that just loved to help people in sailing.

The Video is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vShSG2lDQ8g and well worth a look.

Fair Winds, and RIP Andrew.

Andrew Bart Simpson II

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OK I’m in the Maritimo camp on the 50, so somewhat critical of the New (yet to be built) Riviera 50, especially when I read their somewhat overzealous PR material. (IMHO).

Anyways it seems Riv is starting to “spread the word” with some marketing on the new boat. Here is the PR release on the boats Key Features, word for word from their web site with my take on that with views and comments at the foot of this post.

The original Riviera PR is here http://www.rivieraaustralia.com.au/modelOverview.cfm?type=flybridge&prdID=44&subType=Enclosed

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The stunning new 50 Enclosed Flybridge  is expected to prove equally enticing as her big sister, the 53 Enclosed Flybridge. The new model is currently under construction and will make her world debut in 2013. (Note 1)
The design of the new 50 Enclosed Flybridge, as always, is based on boat owner input, gleaned and distilled over the past two years at specifically held owner forums.
Powered by new generation fuel efficient twin Cummins QSC Zeus 600 pod drives, or alternatively twin Volvo Penta IPS 900s, Riviera’s new 50 Enclosed Flybridge is expected to top 32 knots, cruising between 25 and 28 knots and delivering a range of 400 nautical miles. (Note 2)
Created in-house on Unigraphics 3D software, Riviera’s team of talented and passionate designers and engineers have focused on absolute maximisation of design and space, so they can see the exact size, space and scale of the vessel in the computer long before a single piece of timber is cut for the plug work.
Riviera’s design team has retained that unique Riviera look while introducing some exciting new design aspects such as double side transom doors (Note 3) which allow better access from both the port and starboard sides, mezzanine seating with integrated table, enhanced cockpit storage with a self-draining moulded lazarette bin that has been integrated into the cockpit floor,(Note 4) tender storage on the boarding platform, increased side deck access, a large aft C-shaped lounge that runs the width of the flybridge, flexible accommodation plan, full head room in the two aft cabins,(Note 5) attractive enhancements to the exterior profile lines balancing the flybridge and saloon window, and huge hull windows with opening port holes on both sides giving the two aft cabins an abundance of natural light and fresh air.
An additional 1.7 metres more of overall living space between the bow and stern has been made available through the incorporation of pod drives as compared to a similar sized shaft-driven boat. (Note 6)
“All round this boat feels bigger and fuller than similar sized vessels,  which can be attributed to the openness and an abundance of natural  light,” says Riviera CEO Wes Moxey. “And we know from experience that it will perform well with its standard engine package.(Note 7)
“When you step aboard the new 50 Enclosed Flybridge, you instantly enter a world of the most modern technology encased in time honoured craftsmanship.
“Our design team has been very innovative with the internal plan providing exceptional accommodation without compromising the height or exterior lines of the boat.”(Note 8)
The new 50 Enclosed Flybridge features three luxuriously appointed staterooms and two bathrooms. Acoustic fabric panelling creates a sense of calm and combined with varnished cabinetry gives a feel of contemporary elegance. A washer and dryer are concealed behind varnished cabinetry in the companionway.

In a first for Riviera, there is the option to have the master stateroom forward or aft on the port side. The aft port side option offers a scenic outlook from the large hull window with opening porthole as well as being in a quieter and more stable part of the boat being closer to the centre of gravity, (Note 9) while the full-width master stateroom forward(Note 10)  boasts windows either side, ample under bed storage, an elegantly crafted cedar-lined wardrobe featuring book-ended panelling, built-in bedside tables and a timber vanity – the owners have the choice.
“With that in mind, this new vessel is also the perfect size for three couples or a large extended family,” says Mr Moxey. “At 50 feet, it fits into standard size marina berths without compromising on space and the hallmark qualities of Riviera.”(Note 11)

The new 50 Enclosed Flybridge features a huge cockpit with aft barbecue centre or optional bait tank or fish bins. The barbecue is located aft centre in the middle of the transom doors either side, thus giving easy access to the vessel, especially when rafted up with friends or at the marina. (Note 12)
The vision from the three-sided enclosed flybridge is second to none. (Note 13)

The mezzanine seating has been lowered to allow for a fridge and freezer to be positioned between the galley window and mezzanine seat. There is also a removable table opposite the mezzanine lounge which can be rearranged depending on entertaining requirements. It can be positioned in front of the mezzanine lounge when enjoying a lazy breakfast with the best view in the world or one leg can be lifted and repositioned by turning the table 180 degrees so that a group of people can sit around the table for a social afternoon on board.
Two steps up and you enter the saloon through the full-length sliding glass door. To port there is a huge U-shaped modern galley with polished Corian solid surface benchtops, high quality appliances and accoutrements and ‘timber’ Amtico flooring.

Forward of the galley is a U-Shaped dinette to port and plush L-shaped lounge to starboard with several ottomans allowing for extra seating around the dinette or can be pushed up against the settee to create a large chaise.
An internal staircase adjacent to the galley leads up to the impressive flybridge which features a helm station forward on the port side with an adjacent L-shaped lounge allowing guests to easily converse with the skipper.

A wet bar is located behind the helm chairs and aft in the flybridge is an enormous C-Shaped lounge that runs full beam of the flybridge, making it a great conversation and entertaining space not only when the boat is underway but also at anchor. (Note 14)

From a technological point of view, the new 50 Enclosed Flybridge will have the latest in LED lighting and C-Zone digital switching, which allows you to monitor all your entertainment, electronics and lighting with the touch of a button. (Note 15)
Every engineering detail in the design and construction of this new model has been considered from the engine room with standing head room and its gleaming white gel coat finish making it spotlessly clean, to the location of the cockpit switch panel at eye-level.

Riviera has already taken several orders ‘off the plan’ for the stunning new 50 Enclosed Flybridge which is scheduled for her world release in 2013. (Note 16)

End

  1. Yes, we have been hearing about it’s impending release since May 2012. Launch date was then said to be May 2013.
  2. This is when it gets really interesting. It’s a POD boat remember. At cruise speed you get 400nm on 3200 litres, ie 8 litre/nm. According to Boatpoint   http://www.boatpoint.com.au/reviews/2013/maritimo-m50-cruising-motoryacht-36720  the Maritimo goes 517nm at cruise speed with 4,000 litres that is 7.74 litre/nm. What about the much hyped POD’s 15%-30% fuel savings then ??
  3. What’s exciting about double transom doors for goodness sake. They have been around in Maritimo’s for years.
  4. That’s just trying to talk a negative into a positive. As it is a POD boat all the machinery goes into one large space, so no lazarette. In it’s place you get a “bin” No such thing in a shaft boat. Separate Engine room and Lazarette.
  5.  Again what’s new and exciting about “full head room” in the two aft cabins. Riv 47’s have had that for a long time.
  6. Just a big shame they did not use the extra space for a WOW accommodation layout.
  7. The Cummins QSC Zeus 600 pod are stated as 600Hp I believe. (8.3 litre displacement with WOT @ 3,000RPM). It will be interesting to see some actual test results on how she goes with two of those. The optional Volvo IPS 900 are stated as “700Hp, but equivalent” to a conventional 900Hp installation. (10.8 litre displacement with WOT @ 2,350RPM). What cruise range with those I wonder?
  8. What is so ground braking about Three Cabins with Two heads. Sorry I just don’t get it.
  9. They are basically condemning their own Fwd Master Layout. The central Master has the best COG position so is the best location for the Master, and ideally a Full Beam Master !
  10. Since when has a Fwd Cabin been described as “Full Width Master” It is BS PR on steroids.
  11. I don’t berth in Australia so I don’t know what a “standard size marina berth” is but I know from the Specs the boat is 56′ 6″ LOA and not 50′.
  12. Maritimo have been doing that as standard for Ten years.
  13. It does not look anything special. The Helm is Fwd so just like the Maritimo seeing the Transom when backing into the slip will be a challenge. Note The Maritimo is fully enclosed on four sides not just three.
  14. No Flybridge Aft Deck. Shame. Shame.
  15. C-Zone is nice but it’s complicated electronics. Does everyone need it and it is pricey. Switches work fine !
  16. It was launched in May 2012, so I’m sure those owners will be getting a bit toey  by now !!

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The following Press Release is from the Maritimo site on the following link. http://www.maritimo.com.au/news-events/news/2013/joystick-option-brings-boating-ease-to-a-whole-new-level.aspx

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With some of the weather conditions that are experienced around Port Lincoln boaties often need all the help they can get in maneuvering their vessels in that part of the world and Maritimo 56 Motor Yacht owner Roy Wells is one step ahead of all his counterparts.

In fact Roy and his family are the first people in the world to be experiencing the benefits of a new addition to the joystick control system phenomena that has swept the marine industry in recent years and he says it takes vessel control to a whole new level.

An addition to the traditional joystick system called Express Positioning System (EPS) now enables skippers to manoeuvre their vessels to a desired position and heading and at the press of a button the system then controls automatically the propellers and proportional thrusters to maintain the desired position regardless of wind and tide conditions.

Roy’s Maritimo is the first vessel in the world to have the system fitted.

Maritimo 56

About to be released globally by Twin Disc the  EPS system is an option exclusively for shaft drive boat owners who have the company’s Express Joystick System (EJS) in place and it can be supplied with a new build or can be retro fitted.

The EPS operates off a roof mounted GPS receiver and has a colour display at the main helm. It enables boat owners to ‘virtually park’ their vessels in what ever position they like and the system will maintain station.

For Roy the benefits have been amazing. “We can all get into a bit of trouble docking in big weather and we get a lot of that around Port Lincoln,” he said.

“Even in a strong wind I can hold this big boat close to the dock for as long as I wish, it’s invaluable even when alone without a crew, press the hold station and you have time to set your fenders, sort the ropes all knowing you will stay were you have selected. The hold system buys you time even in a strong wind “I also use the system when I am out tuna fishing. “I have joystick controls in the cockpit and I can finesse the boat to keep the fish exactly where I want it with just my thumb and forefinger then hold the boat when and where I choose by a simple press of a button.

“The EPS option also enables me to position the boat right above a deep fishing hole and hold it there regardless of wind and tide without any need to anchor or keep drifting over a reef or select hot spot and returning to do another drift. “I can now position the boat much closer to those rocks to lay a cray pot down knowing I that I am safe and will stay in position selected.  “I would never consider without the hold station. “Imagine all those times you would just like to freeze the boat where it is, now it’s available, it makes boating more enjoyable and safer. It is remarkable.”

Twin Disc’s Pacific Managing Director, Glenn Frettingham said the company’s Express Joystick System released in 2011 was widely regarded as the smoothest and most precise joystick system on the market.

“The extension of this system is now the Express Positioning System and with our patented Quickshift transmissions we can proportionally control propeller and hydraulic thruster speeds and activate fast and smooth direction changes,” he said.

“The response is instant so the EPS can react quickly to change in wind and current. ” It enables skippers to maintain station in a wide range of conditions.”

Maritimo sales and marketing manager Greg Haines said the systems by Twin Disc made boat handling a breeze for all owners no matter what their experience.

“Many of our buyers are multiple boat owners and they are quite comfortable handling their vessels using engine controls only, but these new systems provide a level of precision and easy of operation that would have been unimaginable only a few years ago,” he said.

“The give shaft drive vessels a level of maneuverability that is superior to anything else on the market.”

Mr Haines said the response to the new systems by Roy Wells was testimony to the benefits they provided.

“It means that coming in and out of the dock, picking up a mooring buoy, maintaining position over a fishing hot spot, holding station to position fenders before docking and boating in bad weather are all now a breeze thanks to the combination of the joystick and the EPS option,” he said.

“I think you will see a lot more Maritimo owners looking at this addition to their vessels.”

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Dec 2013 STOP PRESS : Update : HanseYachts buys Sealine  :  https://maritimo48.com/2013/12/22/hanseyachts-buys-sealine/

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Original Story May 3013

It’s old news (from May 1st apparently) but it seems that Sealine the UK based boat manufacturer that has had a bit of a renaissance over the last few years with some interesting models and design features has gone into administration. The much vaunted “recovery” in boat sales came a bit to late for this brand. Problems in achieving Sales perhaps coming from the change in type of boats buyers are looking for nowadays ?

Here are some Press Reports on Sealine’s demise from around the web.

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Private equity-backed yacht builder Sealine goes bust

1 May 2013

US-based private equity firm Oxford Investment Group has failed to turn around luxury yachts builder Sealine International, which has collapsed into administration.

Graham Bushby and Guy Mander of Baker Tilly Restructuring and Recovery will now take over as joint administrators of the West Midlands-based business.

Sealine has underperformed for a number of years. In 2011, the company posted a £4m loss on revenues of £33m.

Oxford acquired Sealine in August that year and said it would work on expanding the business.

Baker Tilly partner Graham Bushby said, “We appreciate that there will be great uncertainty among staff and we will endeavour to update them at the earliest opportunity.

“We will also be working to maximise recoveries for the company’s creditors, which includes the sale of plant and recovery of monies owed to the business.”

Oxford, which is headquartered in La Jolla, California, targets underperforming or growth companies with revenues of over $20m in the US, Western Europe, Australia and China.

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Sealine boat builders: 234 made redundant

Sealine factory in Kidderminster
Sealine has been trading from Kidderminster for over 40 years

Administrators at a Worcestershire luxury boat company have issued redundancy notices to 234 staff.

Sealine in Kidderminster is one of Europe’s biggest makers of boats.

Baker Tilly Restructuring and Recovery LLP said it was assisting staff “to make claims against the government redundancy fund”.

Sealine has been trading since 1972. It was bought by the Brunswick Corporation in 2001 and was sold to another US firm, Oxford Investment Group, in 2011.

Administrator Graham Bushby said: “We will also be working to maximise recoveries for the company’s creditors, which includes the sale of plant and recovery of monies owed to the business.”

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May 16, 2013 10:59 am

Firms throw new jobs lifeline to axed workers at Sealine boat company

Workers axed by luxury Midland boat maker Sealine are being thrown a lifeline from companies far and wide who are seeking skilled engineers.

Major yacht-builders Sunseeker, in Dorset, have told Wyre Forest MP Mark Garnier they are keen to recruit up to 82 skilled marine engineers and boat-builders from the 234 staff made redundant from Sealine, in Kidderminster, two weeks ago.

While Jaguar Land Rover have contacted the Community Union inquiring about maintenance technicians and engineers for its plant in Castle Bromwich.

Hatt Kitchens, in Hartlebury, have also requested carpenters through the Job Centre, while Cab Automotive, in Tipton, and Breakwells, in Kidderminster, are looking for drivers.

Sunseeker and Jaguar Land Rover are among the firms which will send representatives to a jobs fair at Kidderminster Town Hall between 10am and 2pm on June 7.

MP Mark Garnier, who is spearheading the fair, said: “What is fascinating is that we have been taking calls from Sunseeker and Jaguar Land Rover who are seeking skilled workers.

“I am quite optimistic that these workers from Sealine will be picked up quickly by other companies.

“We now have 40 companies represented who will be showcasing themselves at the fair and seeking to take on workers. We expect about 300 to 400 jobs to be on offer.”

Baker Tilly Restructuring and Recovery was appointed administrators for Sealine following the announcement of their collapse.

Spokesman Frank Shepherd said they had already received interest from 50 parties, with some shown round the site, but said there was no further update.

He said: “We have shown people around the Kidderminster site and have received an encouraging level of interest.

“We are hopeful of a sale but there are never any guarantees.”

Meanwhile workers from Sealine are battling for compensation.

More than 100 workers made redundant by the Kidderminster firm packed a meeting organised by the Community Union last week.

Officials are now applying for a protected award on behalf of the 234 staff and will also pursue unfair dismissal claims.

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Now I know why Maritimo has done so well over the last ten years.

They have cloned Bill Barry-Cotter………

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The real story that goes with this photo is on the Maritimo web site as follows  http://www.maritimo.com.au/news-events/news/2013/new-maritimomustang-dealers-for-victoria.aspx

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NEW MARITIMO/MUSTANG DEALERS FOR VICTORIA

02/05/2013

Two of Victoria’s longest established marine industry identities, Tim Pratt and Andrew Burns, have joined forces in a new venture called Victorian Boat Sales, which will be the official Maritimo and Mustang dealership in the State.

Maritimo sales and marketing manager Greg Haines said the company was delighted with the appointment and was confident that the duo would see a significant lift in the number of Maritimo and Mustang vessels sold in Victoria.

“Tim and Andrew have been around the marine industry for many years and their expertise, professionalism and network of contacts will be invaluable for us as we continue to expand our business,” he said.

“They pride themselves on honesty and customer service so they fit perfectly with our corporate philosophy.”

Victorian Boat Sales is located at the Patterson Lakes Marina and is a Boating Industry Association Member. The company has on site qualified marine engineers and antifouling, detailing and fibreglass capabilities.

Tim Pratt was 17 years with JV Marine where he was responsible for the Mustang brand.  He then started work with Mustang Victoria, a direct factory owned dealership and following a year there he owned and operated Patterson Lakes Boat Sales for the past three years.

Andrew Burns was with JV Marine for 23 years, also involved with Mustang and senior management and spent the last five years with R Marine Jacksons-Victoria Riviera dealership.

“We launched Victorian Boat Sales in late March and we are delighted to have been able to secure the dealership for Maritimo and Mustang in Victoria,” said Tim.

“We are very familiar with both brands and we know the quality and the integrity that they represent so for us it is a perfect fit.”

VBS is a Club Marine insurance agents and also offers competitive boat finance.

“We also include full tuition for buyers of all vessels sold and pride ourselves on honesty and ethical dealings with all customers or prospective customers,” said Tim.

VBS representation of the Maritimo and Mustang brands in Victoria is effective immediately

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To mark Maritimo’s first decade, Boatpoint   http://www.boatpoint.com.au/news/2013/maritimo%e2%80%99s-10th-anniversary-36631  conducted this exclusive interview with founding boat builder and doyen, Bill Barry-Cotter.

For anybody that doesn’t know, Barry-Cotter, is the granddaddy of Australian boat building, having started and sold marques such as Mariner & Riviera. He has been doing it for around 50 years so he really knows a thing or two about what buyers want and “the Business”

Here is the article from Boatpoint.

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Q. Looking back at the first Maritimo you launched, the 60 with or without walkthrough flying bridge, back in Sydney a decade ago — did you ever imagine then that you would be in the position you are today, building the kinds of boats you are now, so well established and with a strong following?

A. No. I really didn’t envisage we would grow as we have. I thought we’d build a few boats and built them properly. That got out of hand and we were making too many before the GFC came along.

The public received our boats really well. The early Maritimo was a practical cruising boat. Good performance. Reasonably fuel efficient. Well built. And well finished.

It was modelled to some degree on the Riviera 46. I had a couple of them myself and I always liked the boat. I also had the last 52 Hatteras we built [under licence]. The thing I missed with that Hatteras was the walkaround decks. So I included those and added features of the Hatteras to make the Maritimo 60.

There was also a restraint of trade with Riviera, after I sold the company, that meant I couldn’t build anything that they had or hadn’t built for seven years so I deliberately picked that kind of boat because they didn’t build one.

The name Maritimo known came about after [wife] Lesley and I were away, we were staying in the Maritim hotel in Germany and then we went to Portugal to the Maritim railway station. We chucked that name around, in Spanish and Italian it means “at sea” and is actually pronounced Ma-rit-imo.

Like most boat builders, the market was flying along till the GFC in say 2008. In the previous boom time, how many boats were you building a year, what percentage were exports, how many people did you have working for you?

The best we did was 78 boats a year. We had 480 people working for us (Riviera had 1200 at the same time). Then after the GFC hit 1600 people disappeared from the Coomera Marine Precinct. That’s direct employed people. Media and government weren’t interested in the problem. No-one cared.

But things are starting pick up again. We were exporting the same percentage then as now — about 55-65 per cent.

How many Maritimo boats have you built all told up until now? What is the current annual target and is Maritimo profitable operating on that basis?

All told, as a close guess, just under or just over 500. Current target now is to try and do 22-25 Maritimos a year. As it picks up I just want to keep it at that. I want to build boats the best we can build them. It’s just not worth the drama of cranking it all up again. Oh, and to that you can add another dozen or so Mustangs.

What’s the all-time best-seller?
The 48. We did 108 of them. And it arrived towards the end of the boom. The 48 has always been a best seller. It will become a classic Maritimo. I did a lot of work on that. I looked at second-hand prices and did a lot of work on trade-in price before our new M50 is released (this week). The 48 is holding its value well. We’ve sold a couple of late-model ones, the Sky Lounge ones, for up to $980K and another one went for same kind of money.

How has the new-boat buyer changed in the new market, ever since the GFC?

The interesting thing with that is there were two distinct markets for boats: old customer who I sold [Mariner] Pacers to 35-40 years ago who had a lot of boats. They know what they want, they are very conservative people and well informed. In boom days that was half our market.

Then you had the stock broker, the property developer who made a lot of money quickly. They would buy the Cabriolets and all the sporty stuff but really didn’t know anything about boating and were more interested in price than quality and boat.

The old customer that we’ve had forever represent 60 to 65 per cent of boats we now sell. I’m happy building for those old customers because you know the people and know what they want.

We just sold a 53 to a good old customer. This is his third Maritimo, he had two 60s before and bought a 53 Cabriolet because he lives beyond a [low] bridge. He came in every Friday afternoon to go through the boat.

He then came on a Saturday morning and he’d arrive at 8am and leave 30 minutes later than rest of the gang in the afternoon and was here for the whole build of his boat. He’s really happy and we’ll have less problem with him that anyone.

What is the single biggest change you’ve seen to the luxury motorcruiser or powerboat market in the last decade?
What has happened, and it is really now starting to help us, particularly with the US, is that buyers are no longer asking “can we get a bigger engine?”

Now they ask how much fuel does it use? All the focus and research is into fuel use. We’re very fuel efficient and that has helped us and got us going to make our boats more and more fuel efficient. It’s a work in progress.

In almost any boat we’re better than pod drives or IPS with our conventional shafts. Now what I’m doing, a lot of work with Volvo, is to drive that further to make our boats even more efficient.

If you can pick up two per cent there’s a huge gain… we’ve been picking that up each year and will keep driving that forward. I look forward to fiddling with some hulls to see if we can get a break through.
In the 50-odd years (apprentice shipwright in 1960, built first Mariner in 1966) or so that you’ve been building boats, is the current climate as tough as you’ve ever seen it?

It is actually. There was a period with Gough Whitlam in ’74. He destroyed the export market. It was tough but nowhere near as tough and as long as this time.

How do you think you can attract future boaters to the Maritimo brand?

The only way I think of doing this is to follow the old customers over those 50 years and see if I can sell them a Maritimo. I had lunch with a customer today who had bought two or three boats off me. I personally sold him his first boat, a Mariner 30, and he gave me a photo of me launching that old boat behind my Falcon GT.

He got out of boating for a few years and now he’s talking about buying a boat and using it for cruising up and down the coast… exactly what Maritimos are good for.

What are your boats’ most significant points of difference compared with your competitors?

To me, it’s the concept of the boat, the enclosed flybridge, the whole boat is designed around cruising and living aboard, it’s easier to get around, they’re walkaround boats with internal stairs that make it practical, and the engineering gear you can get to. I try and keep the simplicity, too. Then there is the fuel efficiency.

Clearly, some big European companies are able to build boats a lot cheaper than we can these days. But are they better? What would you say to local boat buyers shopping on price alone?

The best answer to that is that we sold a Maritimo 48 to a customer in the Seychelles and we flew over for the handover on the boat and the bloke doing the handover explained that the European boats in the Seychelles, the things just fall apart in 18 months. A bit of rough water and the humidity and they just rot away.

Riviera and Maritimo are good tough, long lasting boats.

My answer with anybody with that big, cheap, imported stuff is we can’t even trade it. We can’t get a wholesaler who will buy it.

But if it’s a Caribbean, a Riviera or a Maritimo we can get a price on it. In four to six weeks it’s gone.

So some of this stuff just isn’t cheap when you look at their resale or trade-in price if they can get it. Some owners are getting between half and one-third what they paid for almost-new boats.

And there’s the issue on noncompliance with engines and unsaleable boats that arrive here and can’t be sold back overseas.

Do you see demand for your boats and exports picking up in the near future given the currency correction? What percentage of your production do you hope to export in general in the coming years?

It’s tough on the export front but the US is still our best export market. Where we used to be cheap we’re now very expensive. But again we’re getting the buyer who wants to go cruising and he gets what he wants. We even change layouts, it’s difficult, but that’s what you have to do, and everyone’s happy.

How have you improved the quality of your boats in recent years?

We use independent surveyors. That has worked better than anything. We had internal QC people and a qualified engineer working on all the compliance. Because of the downturn we had to let go all of those people. So I got outside surveyors.

This cost me less money but it is the best thing I’ve ever done. The two surveyors we are working with now are doing a fantastic job. They are uncompromising and just don’t let boats go unless they are fixed properly before leaving the factory.

It really has saved us money, made a better product, and made even happier customers.

Do you see the new cruiser market ever getting back to where it was pre-GFC?

No. I think that was a once-in-a-lifetime period. Today you can’t give away a new game-fishing boat. We sold a 470 Convertible a few weeks ago but the whole game fishing thing is very slow and it’s more to cruising these days.

Even in the U.S. it’s that way. An American said to me in his broad accent the other day, he said, the customer would rather spend three weeks in the Bahamas cruising than have his friends turn his nose up at him for going fishing.

Although your bid for Riviera a year or so ago wasn’t accepted, do you think there’s still room for both boat builders and brands in Australia?

It’s probably good for the customer but from a business point of view…

But some say I should be glad I didn’t get it as the market turned down even more. I’ve even been congratulated for not getting it. Three months later I was glad I didn’t get it.

In the U.S., in the hey day, we [Riviera at the time] were building more fish boats than Ocean, Hatteras and Viking combined. That market has gone.

Do you foresee a time when you retire from boat building and, if so, what are the plans for Maritimo in the future.

I’ve had a few people falling off around me and you have to think about it. What I’ll do in the next three, four or five years is probably do a deal with some guys internally and probably give them a share and build the transition that way.

But for now I’m sticking with it. And our new M50 and S50 are great boats and part of the current evolution to build better and better boats.

Thanks for your time and all the very best for Maritimo in the next decade…

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Here is a photo below of the beautiful Maritimo 48 that I bought from him way back in 2006, Hull Number M48/16.

Great boat & Great times !

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This report comes from Sail-World.com.  http://www.sail-world.com/Cruising/international/Thailand:-Armed-robberies-on-sailing-boats-leave-cruisers-shaken/109199

This is not what you want to hear, from such a cruising destination as Phuket, but frankly there has long been reports of petty crime and theft from boats left in Chalong Bay, for the most part on unattended yachts. They are an obvious target.

In this case, the thieves thought they had the yacht to themselves to gather their stolen loot and ransack the yacht, but they were disturbed by a brave captain.

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Recent armed attacks against yachties by thieves in popular Chalong Bay in Phuket, Thailand, is the first violence that the local cruising community can remember here towards yachts in a very long time. A French yachtsman suffered severe knife wounds during an attack aboard his boat last week, and in another incident shots were fired when thieves were surprised during an attempted burglary on a vacant boat.

It is tragic for cruising sailors when once safe anchoring spots become dangerous and one can only hope that this is an isolated case.   Witnesses reported at least two shots fired in the dark on Chalong Bay last week as a gang of thieves gave chase to a Phuket boat captain who outfoxed the criminals until the police arrived in force.

Capt Bruce Issell was the hero of the incident.  He was warned by a silent alarm at about 11:30pm that intruders had boarded the Davinci, catamaran.

He raced to Chalong Pier, boarded the Davinci’s dinghy and headed for another vessel, a Sunseeker 50, to investigate what had triggered the alarm.

Once aboard the Sunseeker, he motored to the Davinci catamaran with spotlights ablaze at full strength. ‘The thieves found themselves well and truly lit up, but could see only one person aboard the Sunseeker,’ a witness told Chris Husted, News Manager with the Phuket Gazette.

Seeing only one boat approaching them, the thieves attacked the Sunseeker and attempted to board the luxury yacht and capture Capt Issell and his one young Thai crewman. A chase ensued throughout the moored yachts and commercial craft in the bay for some 20 minutes, with the Sunseeker ducking and weaving to hold off the raiders.

‘There were at least two bright flashes as the thieves fired shots at the Sunseeker. You could see the flashes from the shore,’ the witness told the Gazette.

Police reinforcements quickly arrived in dinghies, changing the balance of power. The thieves soon surrendered and were escorted to the floating marina under construction in the bay. ‘They were questioned and handcuffed, and the stolen items were inspected,’ the witness told the Gazette. ‘For all their efforts, the thieves had managed to steal only some children’s foam paddle boards, a set of binoculars, some flashlights and other odds and ends,’ the witness confirmed.

Scuffles broke out as the officers placed the gang of about four men under arrest. The men were then transported to Chalong Police Station in the back of a police pickup truck.

The bright yellow dinghy the thieves had used in the thwarted raid was also seized as evidence.

The catamaran was taken from its mooring to the marina for further police inspection.

‘I could not be less than 100% impressed with all concerned – Bruce Issell and his crewman – and the very professional Chalong Police,’ said the witness, who asked not to be identified publicly.

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Niwat Duangmanee and Theeraphol Malasan, both 21, were later charged with using knives to commit armed robbery, using a vehicle to evade police and receiving stolen property after a cat-and-mouse chase through Chalong Bay marina that ended with police firing into the air and apprehending the men.
It is hoped that the men arrested were the same raiders who have terrorized the Baan Nit area off Cape Panwa in the previous week. A Frenchman whose yacht was anchored in that area was startled by raiders late one night. A scuffle broke out on board and the Frenchman suffered at least seven knife lacerations during the attack, including a cut to his head. Fearing for his safety, the Frenchman did not return to sleep on his yacht that night. It may have proved a prudent move as the thieves returned the same evening and made off with what was reported as a substantial bounty of yachting ‘removables’.
The yacht has now sailed away, no doubt with no intention to return.

by Chris Husted, Phuket Gazette/Sail-World Cruising

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