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Selene 66 For Sale


Stb_Side_@_PhiPiDon_Phuket_16_Nov_2014_2-690x475

Selene 66 (73 Feet)

Listed at YachtFinders Global http://www.yachtfindersglobal.com/used-boats/detail/1322  and available for inspection from Singapore.

At 73 feet in length and very highly spec’ed this is a serious offshore Passage Maker or Coastal Cruiser.

Capable of extended cruising without having to put into port thanks to large fuel capacity, great economy and an impressive list of equipment.
Water Maker, Trash Compactor, Stabilisers, Gensets x 2 , Air Conditioning, Washer, Dryer, Hydraulic bow and stern thrusters and a walk in engine room to name a few.

The full living and dining area of the Selene 66 is on the saloon level and is entered from the cockpit. Owners will enjoy three staterooms with crew quarters aft of the engine room and all staterooms have ensuite heads. The full width master stateroom is complete with a large ensuite, full length closets, and writing desk. The flybridge can be accessed from the stairway in the pilothouse. The Selene 66 flybridge allows for extended deck space that can accommodate a large tender as well as a perfect platform to fish, dive and just relax on.

Machinery spaces aboard are easily accessed through a transom door or main saloon and the engine room features full standing headroom up to 6’2”. All major components are within reach for ease of maintenance. In addition to clean engine room spaces, a massive lazarette includes washer and dryer units stored under a workbench.

Like all Selene yachts, she features fabulous interior woodwork, exotic granite, a selection of glamorous draperies and fabrics, as well as high quality European lighting and interior fittings. She is designed for extended cruising in style, comfort and safety.

  • General

  • Year: 2008
  • Price: $1,950,000 USD
  • Price Details: + GST & Duty
  • Boat Type: Power
  • Boat Type Detail: Trawler
  • Location: Offshore
  • Hull Material: GRP
  • Engine/Fuel: Diesel
  • ID No: #1322
  • Dimensions:

  • LOA: 73′ 5″ ft / 22.38 m
  • LWL: 62′ 3″ ft / 18.98 m
  • Beam: 18′ 8″ ft / 5.69 m
  • Draft: 6′ 4″ ft / 1.93 m
  • Displacement: 70.25 Tonnes
  • Engines:

  • No. of Engines: 1
  • Engine(s) HP: 610 HP
  • Engine Brand: Cummins QSM11
  • Cruising Speed: 10 kn
  • Max Speed: 12 kn
  • Hours: 1301
  • Builder/Designer:

  • Builder: Jet Tern Marine
  • Designer: Howard Chen
  • Tankage:

  • Fuel: 9,841 L
  • Water: 2,271 L
  • Holding: 870 L

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                  Reflections Villa View

My Villa Unit in Reflections at Keppel Bay is now available for Sale with Vacant Possession.

If you are interested to rent or to purchase the unit please get in touch by leaving a comment and I will respond back to you.

Thanks for dropping by.

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                       Kitchen Units

clipper-yachts-arrive-marina-keppel-bay

Interested : Email me on bpetrie@singnet.com.sg or Call on +65 96164464


From ABC News

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2015-06-07/australian-climber-describes-rescue-from-mt-kinabalu-quake/6527618?utm_source

The Local Sabahan Guides were Hero’s.

The Government Rescue response was a farce.

Australian climber describes harrowing escape from Mount Kinabalu earthquake

By Natalie Tencic, staff Updated about an hour ago

Australian woman Vee Jin Dumlao was stranded on Mount Kinabalu
Photo

Australian woman Vee Jin Dumlao was stranded on Mount Kinabalu after an earthquake that killed 11 people.

Supplied: Vee Jin Dumlao

Australian climber Vee Jin Dumlao was atop Malaysia’s Mount Kinabalu when a magnitude-6.0 earthquake hit. When her group was left stranded by rescue officers, they decided to make the perilous journey down themselves.

It was supposed to be a quiet dawn climb.

Leaving at 2:30am for the top of Malaysia’s Mount Kinabalu, Borneo’s tallest mountain, a group of 137 climbers — including two Australians — reached the peak’s granite plateau at dawn, and had expected to be back at Laban Rata for breakfast.

But at 7:30am, that plan abruptly changed.

“We had just completed the ascent to the peak, and [we were] making our descent, taking some photos when we heard a loud crash, and felt the ground shaking,” Vee Jin Dumlao, a clinical psychologist from Sydney, told the ABC.

Though Ms Dumlao felt calm at first, panic set in when the group was told that the magnitude-6.0 earthquake that rocked the mountain had destroyed their route back.

“When our guide took our empty water bottles to be refilled, at perhaps 1:00pm … they came back with news of massive landslides and the route having been decimated and no certainty of rescue,” Ms Dumlao said.

The Malaysian rescue officials said they were making an effort to reach the climbers, but could not land a helicopter due to poor weather.

“Fog was quoted as the reason for not rescuing the climbers, that was certainly true earlier in day,” Ms Dumlao said.

“However, around about 3:30pm the sky actually cleared right up, from ground level up to the mountains and that’s when we thought there’s nothing stopping them now from coming to get us.

“When the clouds lifted all the guides got a phone call from ground level to say ‘alright the helicopters are coming’. We prepared ourselves, we organised ourselves into groups but nothing happened.”

Despite the clearer weather, the climbers and their guides were told by officials that they would not be evacuated until the next morning.

“We were not equipped for an overnight stay, it was an open place, we couldn’t huddle along any walls, because that’s where the risk of landslide was worst,” Ms Dumlao said.

“Many in the group were already getting hypothermia, it was very cold up in the mountains, it was starting to rain at some point, some of the climbers were already getting wet and we hadn’t eaten since 1:00am that morning.

“And that’s when the guides said ‘they’re not coming, we’d better make our way down the mountain ourselves’.”

“When we saw that all the conditions were right for the rescue and yet they had made the position that they were not coming, I was both angry but also determined to make it down on our own,”

Vee Jin Dumlao, Australian climber

After being told, nine hours after the quake hit, that no help would be coming until the next morning, the freezing, hungry climbers were forced to make the perilous journey down the mountain.

“When we saw that all the conditions were right for the rescue and yet they had made the position that they were not coming, I was both angry but also determined to make it down on our own,” Ms Dumlao said.

Ms Dumlao and her travelling partner made the perilous trek, followed by the other climbers, down to Laban Rata, a small village rest stop halfway up Mount Kinabalu.

“There were continuing tremors, continuing rustling of trees and continuing landslides that we could hear in the distance and it was quite fretful really, the potential of being caught in a landslide,” she said.

The Malaysian government reported 13 people were killed in the disaster, and for Ms Dumlao the sight of death all around was confronting.

“When I saw the corpses, lying uncollected in the rock fall, that was probably the point when I realised that things were actually very, very bad, and fear set in,” she said.

Government rescue effort a ‘farce’

Malaysian quake rescue teams rest in front of trail sign

Photo Australian climber Vee Jin Dumlao described the government’s response to the earthquake as a ‘farce’.

AFP: Mohd Rasfan

Arriving at Laban Rata, Ms Dumlao saw uniformed rescuers milling around the “chaotic scene”.

“They were looking rather lost really, and it was the mountain guides who did most of the work attending to the injured, strapping people into stretchers, getting ready to take them down the mountain,” she said.

“The whole government emergency response was a farce.”

She said the effort appeared disorganised, and without helicopters, the rescue officers were of little help, stuck on foot and five hours away from the mountain’s peak.

“They congregated in groups occupying resting spaces, sharing smokes and food that were meant for survivors,” she said.

“A convenient helipad remain unused when they could have transported rescuers to the foot of the peaks. Instead “rescuers” arrived at 4:00pm, nine hours after the earthquake struck, on foot, much too tired to be of help.”

Ms Dumlao said many more people could have been helped, and deaths may have been prevented, had helicopters landed in Laban Rata.

“If the helicopters had delivered some help earlier and landed in the helipad at Laban Rata, they may certainly have been able to attend to any injured people quite sooner,” she said.

After seven hours trekking in the freezing dark, through treacherous rain and mountain-rattling tremors, the climbers reached the trek’s starting point Timpohon. Upon their arrival at 12.30am, the site was strewn with medics, military and media.

All members of Ms Dumlao’s group made it to the mountain’s base safely. But she says emergency services let her, and many Malaysians down.

“I cannot find evidence for me to respect the government who have all the conspicuous demonstration of responsibility but none of the true act of it,” she said.

“It was quite appalling when the rescue services got credit for something they did not do at all.”

Local guides the ‘real heroes’

Australian hiker Vee Jin Dumlao stranded after Malaysia quake says her mountain guide Jomius never left her side

Photo Australian hiker Vee Jin Dumlao was stranded on Mount Kinabalu after a powerful earthquake. She says her mountain guide Jomius never left her side.

Supplied: Vee Jin Dumlao

Ms Dumlao said she was “so grateful” to mountain guide Jomius, who helped the trekkers to safety.

“The journey we took required the engineering of the guides who made abseiling equipment from the bare resources at hand,” she said.

“The mountain guides were the heroes. They risked life and limb and made some difficult decisions that ultimately saved our lives, and had neither help nor recognition from the authorities.

“Many had homes affected in the quake. They lost friends and family yesterday. Yet they remained with us guiding us to safety till the very end.”

She said she appreciated that the guides could have saved themselves much faster without the slow-moving climbers.

“Yet they stayed and did what they could to meet our needs,” she said.

“I have great regard for the people around Mount Kinabalu who are defined by their culture spirituality and most of all their care for people.”

Selene 66 For Sale


Stb_Side_@_PhiPiDon_Phuket_16_Nov_2014_2-690x475

Selene 66 – The ideal Long Range Slow Cruise boat

Selene 66 (73 Feet)

Listed at YachtFinders Global http://www.yachtfindersglobal.com/used-boats/detail/1322  and available for inspection from Singapore.

At 73 feet in length and very highly spec’ed this is a serious offshore Passage Maker or Coastal Cruiser.

Capable of extended cruising without having to put into port thanks to large fuel capacity, great economy and an impressive list of equipment.
Water Maker, Trash Compactor, Stabilisers, Gensets x 2 , Air Conditioning, Washer, Dryer, Hydraulic bow and stern thrusters and a walk in engine room to name a few.

The full living and dining area of the Selene 66 is on the saloon level and is entered from the cockpit. Owners will enjoy three staterooms with crew quarters aft of the engine room and all staterooms have ensuite heads. The full width master stateroom is complete with a large ensuite, full length closets, and writing desk. The flybridge can be accessed from the stairway in the pilothouse. The Selene 66 flybridge allows for extended deck space that can accommodate a large tender as well as a perfect platform to fish, dive and just relax on.

Machinery spaces aboard are easily accessed through a transom door or main saloon and the engine room features full standing headroom up to 6’2”. All major components are within reach for ease of maintenance. In addition to clean engine room spaces, a massive lazarette includes washer and dryer units stored under a workbench.

Like all Selene yachts, she features fabulous interior woodwork, exotic granite, a selection of glamorous draperies and fabrics, as well as high quality European lighting and interior fittings. She is designed for extended cruising in style, comfort and safety.

  • General

  • Year: 2008
  • Price: $1,950,000 USD
  • Price Details: + GST & Duty
  • Boat Type: Power
  • Boat Type Detail: Trawler
  • Location: Offshore
  • Hull Material: GRP
  • Engine/Fuel: Diesel
  • ID No: #1322
  • Dimensions:

  • LOA: 73′ 5″ ft / 22.38 m
  • LWL: 62′ 3″ ft / 18.98 m
  • Beam: 18′ 8″ ft / 5.69 m
  • Draft: 6′ 4″ ft / 1.93 m
  • Displacement: 70.25 Tonnes
  • Engines:

  • No. of Engines: 1
  • Engine(s) HP: 610 HP
  • Engine Brand: Cummins QSM11
  • Cruising Speed: 10 kn
  • Max Speed: 12 kn
  • Hours: 1301
  • Builder/Designer:

  • Builder: Jet Tern Marine
  • Designer: Howard Chen
  • Tankage:

  • Fuel: 9,841 L
  • Water: 2,271 L
  • Holding: 870 L

Please refer to the original content located at geo.garage.

Monday, December 1, 2014

Questions asked about Volvo Ocean Race boat grounding link

Team Vestas Wind informed Race Control at 1510 UTC (Nov. 29, 2014; Day 11) that their boat was grounded on the Cargados Carajos Shoals, Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean

From SailingScuttleButt Team Vestas Wind may likely have concluded their Volvo Ocean Race campaign when their boat was grounded on the Cargados Carajos Shoals in the Indian Ocean on Saturday night, November 29. With both rudders broken and water ingress into the stern compartment, it was a grim moment for skipper Chris Nicholson and his team.

View of the shoal and the Team Vestas grounded from the lagoon side of the reef image via Team Alvimedica

Sitting high on the reef, the crew waited until daylight, then stepped off the boat onto the reef, later to be transferred to a local rescue boat. Now they will stay on nearby Íle du Sud today (Nov. 30), with plans to return to the boat on Monday to remove gear and travel on Tuesday to Mauritius (Dec. 2). Click here for the incident report. Two questions are being asked. Where is Cargados Carajos Shoals and how can a professional team have this kind of accident?

Cargados Carajos with a general nautical chart on the Marine GeoGarage (UKHO)

Cargados Carajos is a group of long lying islands that are .8 square miles in area, with surrounding coral reefs.

What is says in the pilot about the Cargados Carajos shoals (NGA)… no really true if we look at the official maps (overlayed on satellite imagery).

 IN42503A (updated 25/03/2014) :  Approach ENC for Cargados Carajos Shoals (1:45,000)

They are inhabited and belong to Mauritius, an island nation 270 miles to the southwest. Mauritius is about 1,200 miles off the southeast coast of the African continent.

  zoom on the South of Cargados Carajos with the Marine GeoGarage NGA 61551 (1996 3rd ed 1996 NM 04/99) NTM based on the data from the following BA1881 chart :

extract of the BA1881 (ed 1941) UKHO chart, scale 1:121.000 from surveys by Capt Eward Belcher in 1846, HMS Samarang (soundings in fathoms) note : ‘no vessel could venture to approach its seaward face’ (with the Marine GeoGarage)

As to why Vestas Wind ran aground, Vestas Chief Marketing Officer Morten Albæk is delaying comment. “The root cause of the accident is now under investigation. (However) we obviously hope to stay in the race.” A team led by the Vestas shore crew is now en route to Mauritius to further assess the damage to the boat.

positions of Team Vestas Wind (in blue) and Team Alvimedica (in orange)
Team Alvimedica is motoring with sails down about 1.8 miles from the vicinity
of where Team Vestas Wind is grounded.

Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing skipper Ian Walker was not surprised by the incident. “When we went past there we actually said how easy it would be to hit it at night. Fortunately we went through there in the daylight. It is very difficult to see it with the electronic charts, and of course at night you wouldn’t see it at all.”

Screen of the navigation software used onboard (Expedition): with C-Map charts at large scale, showing the Cargados Carajos Bank quite clearly.

Team Alvimedica, which had been near Vestas Wind at the time of the incident, was equally concerned about safely navigating through the area.

“We had been talking about these reefs for some time, so we were already pretty nervous about it,” noted Team Alvimedica navigator Will Oxley in front of Adrena software screen (see video)

Dongfeng Race Team reporter Yann Riou notes how they also had the Cargados Carajos Shoals directly in their path. “Skipper Charles Caudrelier had noticed this archipelago a few days earlier, but it’s worth noting that it’s actually pretty hard to find. In fact, to see it on our electronic charts, you have to zoom right in on top of it. But how and why would you zoom into it if you don’t know it’s there in the first place? So whilst we don’t know exactly what happened on Vestas, we can imagine how it happened.”

 C-Map charts of the grounding area displayed at a small scale :
with digital vector charts, these reefs does not show up at some zoom levels 
(at larger scale -: zoom) Who bothers to “zoom in” when you are in the middle of the ocean?

After analyzing the early information from afar, marine industry consultant and professional navigator Campbell Field provides his opinion on the incident… “Since Vestas Wind grounding there has been a huge amount of speculation and opinion as to how this happened, or who is to blame.

“It is far better to have absolutely no idea of where one is – and to know it – than to believe confidently that one is where one is not.” Jean-Dominique Cassini, astronomer 1170

“I don’t know 100% about other software packages, but Expedition routing can route freely (i.e. with no obstacles) or can be constrained by charts, or your own marks, or your own prohibited zones. Plenty of optimal route outputs run where you would have to put the wheels down. Ultimately, it is the user who defines how the routing output is run and results used. “The point I’m putting forward here is that software does not make someone a navigator. First you must be a navigator, and then know and understand the strengths and limitations of the tools you have. “When this is explained to a lot of people I meet, it is usually met with confused stares. The number of software jockeys (promoting themselves navigators) in yacht racing I have come across, who expect the answers to fall out of their computer, is astounding. Take the deck screen away from them and they couldn’t get out of the marina or find the top mark efficiently if their life depended on it. “Vestas Wind navigator Wouter Verbraak is one of the best, and firmly falls into the category of a superb yachtsman and navigator. He is one who understands the strengths and limitations of digital tools more than most will ever do. And one of the nicest guys in the sport to boot. “Mistakes happen. Just glad they are all safe and uninjured.”

A couple of hours before… (strangely prophetic)

We are Family !


HaHa

Ha Ha !

 

With Music !!


Video here

Yacht Salvage

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